Mumford & Sons

True West Presents at the Moda Center

Mumford & Sons

Special Guest: Portugal. The Man

Mon · August 5, 2019

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

$99.50/$79.50/$49.50/$39.50

This event is all ages

Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons’ new radio single “Beloved” is out today (listen/share HERE). Additionally, a new live video of the song filmed earlier this year at The World’s End pub in London. 



“Beloved” is the second single from the band’s new album Deltafollowing “Guiding Light,” which reached #1 at both Alternative Radio and Triple A Radio (10 weeks). Released late last year to widespread acclaim, Delta debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200, Americana/Folk Albums, Alternative Rock Albums and Rock Albums charts with 230,000 equivalent album units earned (stream/purchase here). This is the band’s third consecutive #1 debut, the largest sales week for an alternative rock album in 2018 and the sixth-largest debut among all titles last year (Gentlemen of the Road/Glassnote Records).



The band is currently in the midst of an extensive 63-date worldwide arena tour including upcoming North American stops at Hartford’s XL Center, Lexington’s Rupp Arena, Atlanta’s State Farm Arena, Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena and Chicago’s United Center among many others. The band’s largest tour to date, the Delta Tour 2018/2019 includes over 800,000 tickets, which are now on sale via www.mumfordandsons.com/live. Of their recent sold-out show at D.C.’s Capital One Arena, the Washington Post proclaims, “The U.K. quartet thrilled a packed Capital One Arena crowd…” and went on to praise their, “…undeniably wondrous arena rock anthems,” while, of their sold-out concert at Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Center, Billboard declares, “It’s exactly the kind of tour that will solidify their spot in the pantheon of arena-friendly bands.” See below for complete tour details.
Produced by Paul Epworth, Delta was written collectively by the band and recorded at London’s The Church Studios. The band recently debuted the album at a series of exclusive fan listening events. The screenings, which took place at theatres across the globe, featured the complete album audio accompanied by visuals curated in partnership with National Geographic. Of the concept, the band shares, “While we were recording and mixing Delta, we watched a lot of films on silent including some pretty epic wildlife films by National Geographic—like a vision-track to our soundtrack. So, we felt it would be a nice idea to let fans experience the record in this way too.”



Recent critical acclaim for Delta…
“…a fine distillation of what makes these guys so engaging…people will relate to the universal doubts and fears that are often stirringly evoked by the music and lyrics on Delta”—American Songwriter



“Mumford & Sons roar back with Delta…redefines what they do and who they are” —Associated Press



“…the band is smack in the middle of its most fertile creative period to date” —Billboard



“…remain capable of recording radio-ready earworms that challenge expectations…while still retaining the major qualities that made them superstars in the first place”
—Consequence of Sound



“…their most drastic expansion in creative scope yet, both sonically and lyrically.” —Esquire 

“…finds the band branching out sonically, though it is still decidedly Mumford & Sons in the expert and engaging songwriting”—Forbes



“A muted, meaningful meditation on change and its results” —Newsday



“…an uplifting anthem that is guaranteed to get fists pumping in the arenas that Mumford & Sons will be headlining.” —New York Post 



“Any album this epic in scope is, at very least, worthy of their reputation.” —Paste 



“Wildly experimental” —Rolling Stone 



“When the band do let their guard down, the effects are immediate…they create something honestly affecting” —SPIN



“Dark and thrilling, this is their best album yet”—The Telegraph *****



“Delta is the best album this band have made so far” —The Times



“For a group that refuses to be defined by their past,  Delta presents a lush and vibrant vision of the band’s future” —UPROXX



“…a new sonic direction for the band in its incorporation of electronic touches and spacey atmospherics” —Vulture



Marking ten years since Mumford & Sons made their meteoric debut, the new music follows 2015’s Wilder Mind, which debuted at No. 1 in the U.S., U.K., Australia Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands and Norway and, most recently, 2016’s collaborative Johannesburg mini album. Previous LPs include 2012’s Babel, which was awarded the 2013 Grammy for Album of the Year, and their 2009 debut, Sigh No More.



Mumford & Sons are Ben Lovett, Marcus Mumford, Ted Dwane and Winston Marshall. 
Special Guest: Portugal. The Man
Special Guest: Portugal. The Man
Everything You Need To Know About Portugal. The Man’s New Album.

Well, we’re two full months into 2017 and the world continues to burn like an avalanche of flaming biohazard material sliding down a mountain of used needles into a canyon full of rat feces. But hey, it’s not all bad: Portugal. The Man has a new album coming out called Woodstock.

PTM’s last album came out over three years ago—a long gap for a band who’ve dropped roughly an album a year since 2006. And in true, prolific band fashion, they’ve spent almost every minute since 2013 working on an album called Gloomin + Doomin. They created a shit-ton of individual songs, but as a whole, none of them hung together in a way that felt right. Then John Gourley, PTM’s lead singer, made a trip home to Wasilla, Alaska, (Home of Portugal. The Man’s biggest fan, Sarah Palin) and two things happened that completely changed the album’s trajectory.

First, John got some parental tough love from his old man, who called John on the proverbial carpet or dogsled or whatever you put people on when you want to yell at them in Alaska. “What’s taking so long to finish the album?” John’s dad said. “Isn’t that what bands do? Write songs and then put them out?” Like fathers and unlicensed therapists tend to do, John’s dad cut him deep. The whole thing started John thinking about why the band seemed to be stuck on a musical elliptical machine from hell and, more importantly, about how to get off of it.

Second, fate stuck its wiener in John’s ear again when he found his dad’s ticket stub from the original 1969 Woodstock music festival. It seems like a small thing, but talking to his dad about Woodstock ’69 knocked something loose in John’s head. He realized that, in the same tradition of bands from that era, Portugal. The Man needed to speak out about the world crumbling around them. With these two ideas converging, the band made a seemingly bat-shit-crazy decision: they took all of the work they had done for the three years prior and they threw it out.

It wasn’t easy and there was the constant threat that the band's record label might have them killed, but the totally insane decision paid off. With new, full-on, musical boners, the band went back to the studio—working with John Hill (In The Mountain In The Cloud), Danger Mouse (Evil Friends), Mike D (Everything Cool), and longtime collaborator Casey Bates (The one consistent producer since the first record). In this new-found creative territory, the album that became Woodstock rolled out naturally from there

Remember that mountain of burning needles we were talking about? Good. Because Woodstock is an album (Including the new single “Feel It Still”) that—with optimism and heart—points at the giant pile and says, “Hey, this pile is fucked up!” And if you think that pile is fucked up too, you owe it to yourself—hell, to all of us—to get out there and do something about it.
Venue Information:
Moda Center
One Center Court
Portland, OR, 97227
http://www.rosequarter.com